A Place to Bury Strangers

(((folkYEAH!))) Presents

A Place to Bury Strangers

Creepoid, King Woman

Sat · March 14, 2015

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$15

Sold Out

This event is all ages

A Place to Bury Strangers
A Place to Bury Strangers
"There are moments where I'm really scared on stage," admits A Place to Bury Strangers bassist Dion Lunadon, "where it's really foggy and I know someone's swinging a guitar around. I don't give a fuck though; if a guitar is about to hit me in the head, oh well. It's going to make for a better show."
He should know. After joining the Brooklyn-based trio in 2010, it only took a few shows before Lunadon smashed his bass against his face. The freshly drawn blood trickled like rain off of a tin roof. But since the band often plays in the dark, he couldn't actually see what happened. He had to keep going, and hope for the best.
"That's the most intense fear and feeling—when you go to a show and you're actually scared," says frontman Oliver Ackermann, a co-founder of the soon-to-be-shuttered Death By Audio DIY space that's hosted its fair share of frantic, life-affirming shows.
"Or you can palpably feel the danger in the music," adds Lunadon, "like it's going to fall apart at any moment and the players doing it are so in the moment they don't give a shit about anything else. They're just going for it. It's a gutter kinda vibe; everything about it is icky and evil and dangerous."
The same could be said for A Place to Bury Strangers' fourth album, Transfixiation. Rather than fixate on precious recording techniques and minute details, the members of the group -- Ackermann, Lunadon, and hard-hitting drummer Robi Gonzalez -- trusted their instincts and tried to keep things as pure as possible. If that meant a mess of cross-contaminated microphones and mud-caked mistakes, so be it. Music is much more exhilarating when it's unpredictable, and from the tortured straight-to-tape transmission of "I Will Die" and molten funk melodies of "Straight" to the violent guitar spasms, cannon-like drums and not-so-idle threats of "Deeper," this is very much an unpredictable record. Gonzalez makes his recording debut with the band here and he's helped push the band's recorded sound closer to the intense level of its infamous live shows.
Considering how controlled the chaos feels at every turn—the mark of a band at the peak of their powers—it's hard to imagine that Transfixiation almost didn't happen. Having spent nearly two straight years on the road, the musicians figured they'd parlay that momentum into a new record as soon as they got settled back home. And while the self-produced sessions at Death By Audio led to some fantastic material, Ackermann hit a wall near the end of that initial month. He needed a long break.
"The way it was broken off was so intense," he says. "It got to be too much, where we—or at least I—almost had a meltdown or something. I felt like we had to stop, and I wasn't even sure if the album was going to get finished or if we were going to be friends again."
Two months passed by with little communication between the three members. Lunadon worked on other recordings, and Gonzalez retreated to a mountainous region in the Pacific Northwest. Meanwhile, Ackermann pieced together the set: fresh compositions, songs that had already been recorded in Brooklyn, and the fruit of an earlier recording session with Serena Maneesh frontman Emil Nikolaisen in Norway. Thankfully, everything clicked. A Place to Bury Strangers became whole again, with a bond—onstage and off—that's arguably stronger than it's ever been.
"Things go wrong all the time," explains Lunadon, "so with anything that's thrown at us, we have to make the best of it and turn something into gold instead of falling apart."
"The one thing we have in common is this fire when we're playing," adds Gonzalez. "I don't know; it's real intense."
The well-oiled Lunadon-Gonzalez rhythm section has adapted to Ackermann's unique style of playing -- the pair has embraced the chain-linked effects (Ackermann has produced custom pedals for such major artists as Lou Reed, My Bloody Valentine, The Flaming Lips, and Nine Inch Nails) and minimized the drum fills.
"It's not rocket science," says Lunadon, "but rock 'n' roll shouldn't be. When you start to do bluesy scales or try to be too fancy, it doesn't work for us. You gotta keep it simple and seize the moment."
Creepoid
Creepoid
Creepoid are a Noise Rock band from Philadelphia. They released two full length LP's on No Idea Records and a brand new EP for Record Store Day 2014 on Graveface Records. They are now joined by Nick Kulp from Far-Out Fang Tooth ( Siltbreeze Records / HoZac Records ). Keep an eye out for upcoming US dates.

They have shared the stage with Kurt Vile, Pains Of Being Pure At Heart, Best Coast, And You Will Know Us By The Trail of Dead..., Obits, Twin Shadow, Warpaint, Black Moth Super Rainbow, Night Beats, Bardo Pond, Psychic Ills, Wooden Shjips, R Stevie Moore, Black Lips, The Love Language, Purling Hiss, Telekinesis, Cloud Nothings, Jacuzzi Boys, Kid Congo, Asteroid #4, and more.
King Woman
King Woman
Bay Area’s King Woman are heading out on this Flenser tour in support of their newly unveiled, highly-praised debut Doubt EP. Released this past March, Doubt touches on some heavy topics and allows vocalist/lyricist Kristina Esfandiari’s ingenuity to really shine; with nods to issues like religious abuse, sex, metaphysics, heartbreak and more. The band wears their musical influence on their sleeve: “We love bands like Black Sabbath, OM, Neurosis and Jesu”, said Kristina, and with her lush and dramatic vocals not unlike Mazzy Star and even Beth Gibbons, King Woman has created a sound all their own. Rolling Stone called Doubt “…part gauzy Mazzy Star-esque fever dream, part lumbering Sabbathian nightmare” and Pitchfork described it “…as dreamlike as it is suffocating.”
Venue Information:
The Chapel
777 Valencia Street
San Francisco, CA, 94110
http://www.thechapelsf.com