Deap Vally

Deap Vally

Shana Falana

Mon · November 12, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18 adv / $20 door

This event is all ages

Deap Vally
Deap Vally
Deap Vally introduced us to their unapologetic style of rock’n’roll in 2013 debut ‘SISTRIONIX’. LA natives Julie Edwards and Lindsey Troy lit heavy, minimalist blues fires throughout the US and Europe, both on record and in their legendary live shows. Lindsey Troy’s sand-and-glue vocals and ferocious riffs rode roughshod over the dynamic explosions of Julie Edwards’ drumming. After several loops around the world, they decided it was time for a gear shift inspired by the pair's desire to create their vision on their own terms.

So the two-piece wielded the time they needed to reassess matters, doing short stints as touring bass players: Lindsey in White Lung and Julie in JJUUJJUU: having a kid, experiencing life stuff, all while recording critically-acclaimed sophomore album ‘FEMEJISM’ with Yeah Yeah Yeah’s Nick Zinner producing.

The process of executing album two while still recovering from a major label hangover (they parted ways with their major label after record 1), found the two feeling less than bright-eyed and bushy-tailed towards each other. ‘We actually went to couples therapy,’ Lindsey admits. Enlisting a professional worked wonders, and the two began to see a way forward, and the vision for their next record began to form.
Their reinvigorated approach is to craft and record songs quickly, catching what falls, and bring new influences into the process, including artists from some of their favorite groups like Savages, Warpaint, Flaming Lips, Peaches, KT Tunstall, Eagles of Death Metal, and Mini Mansions. ‘It’s your classic seven year itch. It was time to bring some other people into the relationship, heat it up,’ quips Julie.

Seven years in to Deap Vally -- and many more than that in the music biz, Lindsey having been a failed major label teen pop star, and Julie having been in a favorite local Silverlake band that operated somewhere below the status of ‘cult’-- their aim now is to engender a sense of freedom and playfulness in the studio, not be weighed down by self-judgement, pressure to perform, adherence to established genre, and other neuroses that in the past essentially gave them mild PTSD.
‘Get Gone’ (label: HundredUp) is the first of many surprise-attack singles the band will release this year, some of which will be bundled into cohesive collections, some of which will stand on their own as tasty treats. ‘As much as we are both old school lovers of the LP format, we really want each track we record to have it’s moment in the sun, instead of any of our babies being relegated to the obscurity of deap cuts.’
Shana Falana
Shana Falana
Veteran NY psych-pop act Shana Falana just released her new LP Here Comes The Wave, her 2nd with Team Love Records. Emerging from New York’s vast drone/psych scene, Shana combines live looping of reverb-drenched vocals and guitar with tribal drums and stunning visual projections. Her live experience has often been described as transcendental.

"Psychedelic dream pop dashed on the rocks of goth defiance" -Stereogum

“If you want to zone out, Shana Falana’s alluring debut LP gives many opportunities to do so.” -Pitchfork

“Dark pop,” Shana Falana calls it, when pressed for a genre. On Here Comes the Wave, the veteran of the Brooklyn and San Francisco undergrounds deals in paradoxes and oppositions: drones stormy and serene, layers of warmth streaked with wildness and troubled riffs, ethereal forces at war and at play. The duality runs deep in the record’s unlikely birth story as well.

In the winter of 2006, Shana lost half of her index finger in a workplace elevator accident in New York City. On the passenger seat of her car that morning—when the shoegaze/psychedelic songwriter was pulled over (and let go) with expired California plates and no insurance—sat cassette tapes of Django Reinhardt and Jerry Garcia, two guitarists famous for adapting to missing or damaged fingers in the pursuit of their art.

Themes of synchronicity, and gain born from loss, recur throughout the story and the record. Shana grappled with addiction and wrote furiously following the accident and this burst of driven productivity, a decade later, accounts for half of the potent, transformational songs on Here Comes the Wave. “Somehow, I knew those songs would serve me well later,” says the long-sober and creatively disciplined Shana Falana. The emotional turmoil of addiction seethes through the unstable sludge and fuzz of “Lie 2 Me,” but in the light and buoyant psychedelia of “Cloudbeats,” Shana hears the call of her own recovery, several years before it actually began.

Luminous, wise, and empathetic new songs comprise the other half of Here Comes the Wave, forming a dialogue between selves across a great expanse of time and personal transformation. On the single, “Cool Kids” she delivers an ethereal message of acceptance to her younger self and to all young people disfigured by social pressures, driven to addiction, marginalized by gender and racial identities. On the record’s cover, a polaroid self-portrait Falana took long before “selfie” was a word is artfully streaked and defaced by artist Carla Rozman.

Here Comes the Wave is Shana Falana’s second collaboration in as many years with producer D. James Goodwin (Bob Weir, Whitney, Kevin Morby) and long-time partner and drummer Mike Amari, both of whom play a larger role here than on 2015’s Set Your Lightning Fire Free. As is their way, Shana and friends trusted the material and their process, recording and arranging quickly, layering generously, going for audacious sounds and heightened moments. They had reason to be bold going into this record; the last one had been featured in the television series American Horror Story and generously affirmed by Pitchfork, Village Voice, Stereogum and others.

Themes of maturity and closure abound: letting go of youth (and eulogizing her native San Francisco’s D.I.Y scene in the exquisite “Castle Kids”); coming to terms with the death of her father and of a musical hero and father figure in Lou Reed, whose song “Ocean” closes the record with a gradual wash of clarity, acceptance and affirmation.
Venue Information:
The Chapel
777 Valencia Street
San Francisco, CA, 94110
http://www.thechapelsf.com