777 Valencia Street San Francisco, CA 94110 - Map
Doug Tuttle

(((folkYEAH!))) Presents

Doug Tuttle

Sam Kogon

Sun, February 18, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Chapel

San Francisco, CA

$15.00

This event is all ages

Doug Tuttle
Doug Tuttle
Massachusetts songwriter Doug Tuttle returns with his third solo album,

'Peace Potato', once again on Chicago label Trouble In Mind Records.

His 2013 solo debut (after fronting his longtime psychedelic band, MMOSS) was an insular and foggy psychedelic masterpiece punctuated by Tuttle’s stinging guitar leads, accented by flashes of bedroom Fairport /Crazy Horse brilliance, towing the line nimbly between elegance and ragged assurance. We last saw Tuttle on “It Calls On Me”, his 2015 sophomore album, which pushed his songwriting towards further clarity and melody; 'Peace Potato' shakes it all down with Tuttle’s strongest batch of songs yet.
'Peace Potato' introduces itself with the horn-laden, honeydripper,“Bait The Sun”, a classic Tuttle tune; downer pop melodies coloring a hypnagogic landscape. It is indeed that state of lucid dreaming, somewhere between the onset of sleep is where Tuttle firmly plants the seeds of “Peace Potato”. Songs like the addictive Harrison-esque acoustic strummer “Can It Be” and majestic “Only In A Dream” kick in and fade out like the lurching of the mind’s dream state, with the listener’s only guide being Tuttle’s fragmented sensory narrative. (see the undulating, utterly-effected “Life Boat” floating near the end of the first side. Songs stutter to life and grind to a halt, to calculated effect, stitched together into a patchwork of full tunes, song fragments and waves of melodic euphoria.

Throughout all, Tuttle’s guitar picking and soloing echoes the greats of decades prior, Harrison, Thompson, Clarence White, with a conscious eye to the unsung bedroom and basement weird pop genius of sung and unsung artists like Harumi, Sixth Station, The Bachs and Jim Sullivan. Tuttle played every instrument and recorded the entirety of 'Peace Potato' in his Somerville bedroom studio; a ubiquitous location in these modern times, but the ease at which Tuttle’s songs fold and unfold, suggests something more than your usual home recorded musings, “Peace Potato” feels natural and comfortable in it’s skin.
Sam Kogon
Sam Kogon
From its surreal title and occult cover art to its grand buffet of vintage sounds and period production moves, Sam Kogon’s Psychic Tears is a lavish, painstakingly detailed work of modern-retro guitar pop. But what distinguishes the Brooklyn artist from the psychedelic pop herd is not his access to Mellotrons, Vox Continentals, and Russian fuzz boxes. It is Kogon’s vast and fluid command of chamber pop harmony and arrangement. It’s his long-arc melodic genius and his sweet, understated crooning—the real reasons why we revere Sir Paul, Brian Wilson, The Shins, or New York’s own baroque pop institution, The Left Banke, for whom Kogon served as lead singer during a short-lived reunion in 2015.

Psychic Tears sounds robustly old school without much at all in the way of explicit references (though the chugging boogie of the delightful Marc Bolan homage “I’m Letting Go” makes a brief exception). Kogon’s retro is seldom studied or doctrinal; this is just the way he hears it, his natural voice as a composer/arranger. Many standout tracks depart from the period vibe entirely, notably “I Was Always Talking,” a timeless pop duet with Frankie Cosmos; and the nervy new wave rocker “I Could Kick Myself,” which channels the barely controlled downhill energy of Elvis Costello and the Attractions circa This Year’s Model.

A native of New York’s mid-Hudson valley (site of the currently hopping Kingston and Hudson scenes), Kogon’s family has owned a pawn shop for over 100 years, perhaps accounting for the unstable and fritzed out guitar tones in evidence all over Psychic Tears. The record balances its embarrassment of exquisite melodies with a nasty punk urgency and lots of sonic horseplay, speaking to the rich contradictions in Kogon’s heritage: His grandfather Lonnie played Drums in the 1950's rock and roll group The Thunderbirds. On his mother’s side, he is related to Arthur Fiedler, the legendary conductor of the Boston Pops.

Released not long after his skills were authenticated by several collaborations with The Beach Boys’ Al Jardine, Kogon’s pop-wunderkind 2015 debut Before You Knew Me attracted the attention of the Beyond Beyond Is Beyond label, leading to this short-order follow up and a big step up in production values. Recorded at the Figure 8 studio of NYC-scene stalwart Shazad Ismaily (Lou Reed, Tom Waits), Psychic Tears was produced by Celestial Shore’s Sam Owens and mixed by Gabe Wax (Speedy Ortiz, Here We Go Magic, Beirut, The War On Drugs, Cas McCombs). Kogon wisely kept his core ensemble together for this effort, leveraging their road-tested chemistry and the inspired fancy-bits string parts provided by longtime collaborator Finnegan Shanahan.
Venue Information:
The Chapel
777 Valencia Street
San Francisco, CA, 94110
http://www.thechapelsf.com