faUSt

Superior Viaduct presents

faUSt

Heron Oblivion, Bill Orcutt (electronic set)

Sat · March 19, 2016

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$25.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

DJ Sets by Paul Costuros and Darragh Skelton

faUSt
faUSt
Books out! Class work! Subject: Geometry. What do all these rectangles, circles, dots, and triangles mean to you? It's not so old-school when Werner "Zappi" Diermaier presents his geometrical forms. But the question that bandmates and the audience at the California Institute of the Arts were confronted with was a rather similar one: How would you transform the graphic score, which is currently projected onto the screen, into acoustic signals? The result was a wildly meandering, high-intensity, 23-second symphony, in which the onomatopoetic knot bursts. "It's a sort of dadaist choir, a musique impressioniste," says faUSt founder Jean-Hervé Péron. "People participated right away." "Sounds like a sporting event! And the audience screams: Hurray!" says Zappi Diermaier. Two perspectives on one idea from faUSt. Very good! Sit down! Continue!

But let's start from the beginning. faUSt has recorded a new album. It is entitled "Fresh Air" and differs in several respects from its predecessor "Just Us", from the year 2014. At the time, the recordings were made at Péron's rehearsal studio in Schiphorst in northern Germany, hypnotic pieces with the kind of noisemaking the band is known for. For the new album, Péron and Diermaier were looking for communication with musician friends and the audience. The tracks were recorded in changing ensembles at changing locations in the USA (during a 28-day tour in March/April 2016).

In these community recordings, with friendly support from Péron's database of field recordings, a strongly shaded noise music emerged which extends its feelers to the remotest corners of the here and now. Droning, swinging, lusting for freedom, here and there holding out quite stoically as machine-room blues. Or just phonetically - along the geometry. On board are the freely fabulous Barbara Manning in a live lecture, Jürgen Engler (Die Krupps) in overdub and Ysanne Spevack as a wonderful wavemaker on the viola. The seven and a half minute title track, which faUSt deliberately placed at the beginning of the album ("so you can enjoy it for a long time," says Zappi Diermaier), begins with the poem by a French school friend of Péron (translated and recited in Polish) and ends in an industrial sound inferno. The singer cries for "Fresh Air" as if it is being taken away from him. Jean-Hervé Péron offers a political reading: "Can you breathe calmly here, or are we being poisoned?"

"Engajouez vous!" Péron presents this franco-faUStian artificial word to the audience and rewrites the Marseillaise for the here and now in the track "Chlorophyl": "Allons enfants de l'Anarchie, notre jour de jouir est arrivé". The call results from wild horror at a collapsing world: "Artists, engage through your songs, L'art pour l'art is finished." Péron quotes with his voice, above the polyphonic undergrowth that colleague Zappi so nimbly unleashes, and Barbara Manning sneaks word sketches from her bag of tricks into the hymn. And finally, Zappi has his mini-dada performance with "Schnobs" and "Bia": a small dialect-based text piece, which starts with Chlorophyl, goes over the meadow past the cow and lands with the farmer who drinks a beer and a schnapps and suddenly sees two cows. "Is it from the chlorophyl?"

Good question, but no answer comes. At the last moment, these texts also want to join in the shuffle. The words and music and noise fall together continuously, sometimes a track is created completely from the free interplay of the forces that emerge when the musicians in the session approach each other. "Enlightened dilettantism" is the term used by faUSt. The story of the band can tell that tale nicely.

As Krautrockers, faUSt (as the name was written before they later reformed) had a worldwide career. On their first three albums in the early 1970s, they inhabited the vast field from improvisation to bricolage to rock'n'roll with the ease of rogues and the determination of declared sonic renegades. They were big in Britain before the notion of Krautrock had made the rounds in Germany. One can still feel the breathing of this music, the bubbling of this primal soup, in current faUSt pieces, in the stone-age thudding of "Fish", which faUSt anticipated in 1972 on "Mamie Is Blue". But you will also be able to distinguish the as-yet- unheard if you allow yourself enough audio time. The sound of a squeaky door from the house of Jean-Hervé Péron, for which the musician has the same kind of enthusiasm others might reserve for a brilliant guitar riff ("gripping, touching"); or the minute-long fadeout of "Fish", which Zappi Diermaier is so excited about. The only plan is for the band to take off without a plan. "We let the music play through us," says Jean-Hervé Péron. Everything else is up to the listener, to make his own film. Jean-Hervé Péron has a little tip for us: Listen to the fish.
Heron Oblivion
Heron Oblivion
San Francisco’s Heron Oblivion is the new group featuring Meg Baird (Espers), Noel Von Harmonson (Comets on Fire, Six Organs of Admittance, Sic Alps, The Lowdown), Ethan Miller (Comets on Fire, Howlin’ Rain, Feral Ohms), and Charlie Saufley (Assemble Head in Sunburst Sound).

Heron Oblivion’s origins date to 2013 in SF’s Bayview district, where its four members– fueled by a love of 60s/70s scuzz and commune jams, folk rock, noise, and P.S.F. Japanese underground—would get together for what Miller describes as “blistering, extended free jam sessions.” The four musicians realized that their initial chemistry (which was strong from the outset) was undeniable and it’s vision unified. Heron Oblivion was born.

Ultimately, Heron Oblivion fused song craft to its improvisational leanings. What materialized is a mesmeric compilation of English folk rock and earthy West Coast psychedelia spiked with feedback and explosive dissonant elements. The sum of these elements will make up their Sub Pop debut, due out spring 2016.
Bill Orcutt (electronic set)
Bill Orcutt (electronic set)
Since 2014, software engineer and occasional avant-guitarist Bill Orcutt has been developing an open source computer music program called "I Dropped My Phone the Screen Cracked" and has used it to record two LPs, 2016's "Cracked Music" and 2017's "An Account of the Crimes of Peter Thiel and His Subsequent Arrest, Trial and Execution" which the Wire magazine described as "maddening", "hypnotic" and "oddly pleasant."

As one of experimental music's most influential guitarists, Bill Orcutt weaves looping melodic lines and angular attack into a dense, fissured landscape of American primitivism, outsider jazz, and a stripped-down re-envisioning of the possibilities of the guitar. Whether he’s playing his decrepit Kay acoustic or gutted electric Telecaster (both stripped of two of their strings, as has been Orcutt’s custom since 1985), Orcutt’s jagged sound is utterly unique and instantly recognizable, compared with equal frequency to avant-garde composers and rural bluesmen. The New York Times has called him a "powerful musician... a go-for-broke guitar improviser," and described his sound as "articulated sprays of arpeggiated chords and dissonance."

Orcutt originally appeared on the underground scene as a co-founder of Harry Pussy, whose explosive music combined ‘70s no wave, the ferocity of ‘80s hardcore, and the acrobatic intricacy of Cecil Taylor. Seemingly single-handedly, and over the course of dozens of releases, Harry Pussy built the prototype for noise-rock in the ‘90s and beyond. Throughout, Orcutt (aided occasionally by a second guitarist) wove incandescent, treble-heavy lines through the maelstrom of Adris Hoyos’ percussion. They toured extensively, performing or traveling with bands like Sonic Youth, Sebadoh, The Dead C, and Guided by Voices, before screeching to a halt in 1997. Writing about a 2008 compilation of their work, Pitchfork described Harry Pussy as "just about the most abrasive band America has ever seen."

After a hiatus of over a decade, Orcutt reemerged as a solo artist, at first performing solely on acoustic guitar. Drawing influences from Cecil Taylor (again), Dylan’s Basement Tapes, and the recursive voice of Gertrude Stein, Orcutt began exploring the invisible threads linking free improvisation to the forgotten crevices of the American songbook, from blues to minstrelsy.

Upon his return, recognition was immediate. His 2009 album "A New Way To Pay Old Debts," originally released on Palilalia and reissued by the acclaimed Viennese electronic music label Editions Mego, was named 3rd best recording of that year by WIRE magazine, who praised its "tense muscularity." Orcutt went on to work extensively with Editions Mego, issuing a total of four records under their auspices. NPR named Orcutt's 2011 album "How The Thing Sings" as the 3rd best avant garde album of the year, commenting that his playing would "make Derek Bailey do a double-take". His 2013 album of standards, "A History of Every One," made NPR's list of the year's best new guitar records, and was singled out by the Guardian, who described it as "covers of traditional American songs, deconstructed in lurching flurries of twanging metal." Most recently, Orcutt's 2015 album "Colonial Donuts" was ranked #14 on Rolling Stone's Best Avant Garde Albums of The Year.

Orcutt maintains an active tour schedule, performing in North & South America, Asia and Europe, and appearing at festivals world-wide, including Hopscotch (Raleigh), Incubate (Tilburg), Le Nouveau Festival du Centre Pompidou (Paris) and Unsound (Krakow). Rolling Stone described his performance at 2014's Big Ears Festival as "savage."

In recent years, Orcutt has resumed his paint-peeling electric guitar attack, best represented by his collaborations with drummers (Chris Corsano or Jacob Felix Heule), guitarists (Loren Connors and Sir Richard Bishop), and others (including cellist Okkyung Lee and vocalist Haley Fohr of Circuit des Yeux). His newest work continues the guitarist's signature interrogation of his instrument, yet signals a new phase of cautiously-employed conventional melody and song structure. With each recording and performance, Bill Orcutt continues to invent a sonic vernacular built around raw and tortured tones, ragged minimalism, and seemingly inexhaustible improvisational stamina.

"No one is playing acoustic guitar like Bill Orcutt right now. No one."

NPR

"Quite awe-inspiring, and unlike anything else I can think of."

Wire Magazine

"Anyone can admire the raw soul of his playing and the way he shoots out ideas in real-time, reacting so quickly it's as if he's creating a new language as he speaks it... it's impossible to listen to A New Way to Pay Old Debts without being affected by it."

Pitchfork

"When Bill Orcutt starts playing the acoustic guitar, it's clear there are still so many new things to be said with it."

The Guardian

“Having rehabilitated an old Kay acoustic guitar, slack-tuned to ease the tension on a cracked headstock, Bill had developed a signature style of glottal runs and deep string-bending akin to a 21st century country blues. This, refracted through an increasingly wry presentation, has constituted his re-emergence as one of the most baffling instrumentalists and conceptualists of the time.”

BOMB Magazine
Venue Information:
The Chapel
777 Valencia Street
San Francisco, CA, 94110
http://www.thechapelsf.com